Who’s afraid of fever?

@article{Richardson2015WhosAO,
  title={Who’s afraid of fever?},
  author={M. Richardson and E. Purssell},
  journal={Archives of Disease in Childhood},
  year={2015},
  volume={100},
  pages={818 - 820}
}
The nurses on the children's ward used to have a very fixed approach to fever in young children. If the child had a temperature of 38°C, they would strip the child down and ask the junior doctor on duty to write up some paracetamol. If the child had a temperature of 39°C, they would ask the doctor to write up ibuprofen as well as paracetamol. The doctors would readily comply with these requests. These practices raise a number of questions. Why are we trying to reduce body temperature in a… Expand
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