Whither Model Organism Research?

@article{Fields2005WhitherMO,
  title={Whither Model Organism Research?},
  author={Stanley Fields and Mark Johnston},
  journal={Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={307},
  pages={1885 - 1886}
}
Model organisms such as the yeast, worm, and fruit fly have been stalwart allies of biologists for decades. But now that we know so much about the cell and molecular mechanisms of these organisms, is it time to retire them to the lab9s dusty top shelf? Not likely, say Fields and Johnston in their Perspective. The authors argue that model organisms will remain in the research spotlight for many years to com 
The paradox of model organisms
TLDR
The fate of E. coli suggests that model organisms can become even more valuable for studying cellular processes once their biology is well understood, and animal rights activists have seized on this argument, but show little interest in appreciating the huge contribution thatmodel organisms have made to molecular biology. Expand
Research proceedings on amphibian model organisms.
TLDR
A brief introduction on the progress and limitations of these animal models in biology and human disease research is given, and the potential and challenge of Microhyla fissipes as a new model organism is discussed. Expand
Simple is good: yeast models of neurodegeneration.
TLDR
The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is the best-studied eukaryotic cell, at both genetic and physiological levels, and its recent contributions toward the understanding of neurodegeneration are reviewed. Expand
Yeast as a model eukaryote in toxinology: a functional genomics approach to studying the molecular basis of action of pharmacologically active molecules.
TLDR
The use of yeast as a model organism in neurobiology is reviewed, emphasizing work done towards elucidating the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and the mechanism of action of neurotoxic phospholipases A(2). Expand
Model organisms for genetics in the domain Archaea: methanogens, halophiles, Thermococcales and Sulfolobales.
TLDR
This review presents the advantages and disadvantages of working with each archaeal group, gives an overview of their different genetic systems, and direct the neophyte archaeologist to the most appropriate model organism. Expand
The Mouse Lemur, a Genetic Model Organism for Primate Biology, Behavior, and Health
TLDR
A citizen science project in which students across Madagascar explore the remarkable biology around their schools, including longitudinal studies of the local mouse lemurs, is begun, with the aim of establishing a new and ethical method of genetics that bridges biological, behavioral, medical, and conservation disciplines. Expand
Re view Article MODEL ORGANISMS USED IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OR MEDICAL RESEARCH
A model organism is a non - human species that is studied to understand specific biological phenomena with the expectation that investigation s made in the organism model will provide insight into thExpand
Choanoflagellate models - Monosiga brevicollis and Salpingoeca rosetta.
TLDR
The newly available genomic resources and functional techniques provide important insights into the function of choanoflagellate pre- and postsynaptic proteins, cell-cell adhesion and signaling molecules and the evolution of animal filopodia and thus underscore the relevance of choinoflAGEllate models for evolutionary biology, neurobiology and cell biology research. Expand
The future of model organisms in human disease research
TLDR
The direct discovery of disease genes and variants in humans has been revolutionized, first by genome-wide association studies and now by whole-genome sequencing, and it is now much easier to directly identify potential disease genes in humans. Expand
From the baker to the bedside: yeast models of Parkinson's disease
TLDR
This work focuses on existing yeast models of the molecular underpinnings of Parkinson’s disease (PD), focusing primarily on the central role of protein quality control systems. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...