Whiteness and the Historians' Imagination

@article{Arnesen2001WhitenessAT,
  title={Whiteness and the Historians' Imagination},
  author={Eric Arnesen},
  journal={International Labor and Working-Class History},
  year={2001},
  volume={60},
  pages={3 - 32}
}
  • E. Arnesen
  • Published 1 October 2001
  • International Labor and Working-Class History
Scholarship on whiteness has grown dramatically over the past decade, affecting nu- merous academic disciplines from literary criticism and American studies to history, sociology, geography, education, and anthropology. Despite its visibility and quantity, the genre has generated few serious historiographical assessments of its rise, development, strengths, and weaknesses. This essay, which critically examines the concept of whiteness and the ways labor historians have built their analyses… 
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