White matter hyperintensities in late life depression: a systematic review

@article{Herrmann2007WhiteMH,
  title={White matter hyperintensities in late life depression: a systematic review},
  author={L. Herrmann and M. Le Masurier and Klaus P. Ebmeier},
  journal={Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry},
  year={2007},
  volume={79},
  pages={619 - 624}
}
Background: White matter hyperintensities in MRI scans are age related but appear to be more prevalent in depressed patients. They may be more pronounced in late onset depression. This finding, if confirmed, would potentially illuminate the heterogeneity of depression in elderly subjects. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature search of studies investigating white matter changes in late life depression, identifying 98 studies. The 30 remaining eligible studies were scrutinised for the… Expand
White Matter Hyperintensity Accumulation During Treatment of Late-Life Depression
TLDR
This is the first study to demonstrate similar findings over a short interval (ie 12 weeks), which corresponds to the typical length of an antidepressant trial, and serves to highlight the acute interplay of cerebrovascular ischemic disease and LLD. Expand
White matter hyperintensities in elderly patients with late-onset and early-onset depression: a comparative study
TLDR
WMH are more associated with LOD in elderly patients in this hospital-based, cross-sectional, comparative study with consecutive referral. Expand
Characterization of White Matter Hyperintensities in Large-Scale MRI-Studies
TLDR
WMH research is a vivid field with a need for further standardization regarding definitions and used methods, and a remarkable variety of segmentation techniques was applied. Expand
Striatal Hypodensities, Not White Matter Hypodensities on CT, Are Associated with Late-Onset Depression in Alzheimer's Disease
TLDR
Findings suggest that late-onset depression may be a process that is distinct from the neurodegenerative changes caused by Alzheimer's disease. Expand
Age at onset and vascular pathology in late-life depression.
TLDR
It is suggested that elderly subjects with LOD have greater vascular impairment than those with an early-onset illness and whether preventing vascular disease at an earlier age may decrease the risk of last onset depression is a potential area for future research. Expand
White Matter Hyperintensities and the Course of Depressive Symptoms in Elderly People with Mild Dementia
TLDR
Volume of white matter hyperintensities, in particular frontal deep WMH, were positively correlated with baseline severity of depressive symptoms, and seemed to be associated with persistent and incident depression at follow-up. Expand
White matter lesions and depression in patients with Parkinson's disease
TLDR
The findings suggest that WMH in the deep white matter may contribute to depression in PD. Expand
Localization of white-matter lesions and effect of vascular risk factors in late-onset major depression
TLDR
Investigation of the association between the localization and load of WMLs in late-onset major depression with respect to vascular risk factors indicates that lesion localization rather than lesion load differs between patients with late-ONSet MD and controls. Expand
Magnetic resonance imaging in late-life depression: vascular and glucocorticoid cascade hypotheses
TLDR
The relationship between age at onset and magnetic resonance imaging measures of grey and white matter was compatible with the vascular hypothesis, and provided some support for the glucocorticoid cascade hypothesis. Expand
Comparison of brain structural variables, neuropsychological factors, and treatment outcome in early-onset versus late-onset late-life depression.
  • B. Disabato, Carrie Morris, +5 authors Y. Sheline
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The American journal of geriatric psychiatry : official journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
  • 2014
TLDR
Age at onset of depressive symptoms in LLD subjects are associated with differences in cortical thickness and white matter and subcortical gray matter hyperintensities, but age at onset did not affect neuropsychological factors or treatment outcome. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 91 REFERENCES
Anatomic location and laterality of MRI signal hyperintensities in late-life depression.
TLDR
Left-sided white-matter lesions were significantly associated with older age of depression onset, whereas right-anterior white matter and left-subcortical lesions (particularly in the putamen) were associated with melancholia in the depressed group. Expand
White matter hyperintensities and chronicity of depression.
TLDR
WMHs on MRI are associated with poorer outcome in elderly depressed subjects and further studies are needed to evaluate WHMs as prognostic factor for an appropriate treatment decision-making. Expand
White matter hyperintensity progression and late-life depression outcomes.
TLDR
Greater progression of WMH volume is associated with poor outcomes in geriatric depression and future work is needed to develop means of slowing the rate ofWMH progression and to determine whether this will lead to improved depression outcomes in elderly persons. Expand
A volumetric study of MRI signal hyperintensities in late-life depression.
TLDR
The results support the "vascular depression" hypothesis and suggest that those with depression but without traditional vascular risk factors may be much more susceptible to cerebrovascular disease than normal subjects. Expand
Cognition and white matter hyperintensities in older depressed patients.
TLDR
Large amounts of white matter hyperintensity are more frequent in patients with late-onsetdepression than in elderly subjects with early-onsets or no depression; both late- and early-ONSet elderly depressed patients show mild decrements in some "right hemisphere" cognitive skills. Expand
Localization of age-associated white matter hyperintensities in late-life depression
TLDR
This study demonstrates a different pattern of age-related lesion location between depressed and control subjects, and further supports the theory that frontostriatal disconnection contributes to late-life depression. Expand
Subcortical hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with severe depression—A longitudinal evaluation
TLDR
The study supports the notion that a subgroup of patients with late-onset depressive disorders, without a family history of depression, and with risk factors to cerebrovascular disease, have extensive WMHS on MRI, and that such structural brain changes predispose to chronic depression and progressive cognitive decline. Expand
Data from the VITA Study do not support the concept of vascular depression.
  • M. Rainer, H. Mucke, +6 authors P. Fischer
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The American journal of geriatric psychiatry : official journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
  • 2006
TLDR
The authors found no indication that white matter hyperintensities or minor ischemic lesions played a role in the depressed cohort, casting doubt on the vascular hypothesis of late-onset depression. Expand
MRI signal hyperintensities in geriatric depression.
TLDR
These findings support those of neuroimaging studies implicating the basal ganglia in depression and geriatric depression and suggest that the relationship observed in some reports between late-onset depression and MRI hyperintensities is most likely a function of cerebrovascular disease risk and age. Expand
Subcortical hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging: Clinical correlates and prognostic significance in patients with severe depression
TLDR
Preliminary evidence supporting the clinical and prognostic significance of extensive white matter hyperintensities in patients with severe depression is provided. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...