Which outcomes are most important to people with aphasia and their families? an international nominal group technique study framed within the ICF

@article{Wallace2017WhichOA,
  title={Which outcomes are most important to people with aphasia and their families? an international nominal group technique study framed within the ICF},
  author={Sarah J. Wallace and Linda E Worrall and Tanya A Rose and Guylaine Le Dorze and Madeline Cruice and Jytte Isaksen and Anthony Pak Hin Kong and Nina N Simmons-Mackie and Nerina Scarinci and Christine Alary Gauvreau},
  journal={Disability and Rehabilitation},
  year={2017},
  volume={39},
  pages={1364 - 1379}
}
Abstract Purpose: To identify important treatment outcomes from the perspective of people with aphasia and their families using the ICF as a frame of reference. Methods: The nominal group technique was used with people with aphasia and their family members in seven countries to identify and rank important treatment outcomes from aphasia rehabilitation. People with aphasia identified outcomes for themselves; and family members identified outcomes for themselves and for the person with aphasia… Expand

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