Which evolutionary processes influence natural genetic variation for phenotypic traits?

@article{MitchellOlds2007WhichEP,
  title={Which evolutionary processes influence natural genetic variation for phenotypic traits?},
  author={Thomas Mitchell-Olds and John H. Willis and David B. Goldstein},
  journal={Nature Reviews Genetics},
  year={2007},
  volume={8},
  pages={845-856}
}
Although many studies provide examples of evolutionary processes such as adaptive evolution, balancing selection, deleterious variation and genetic drift, the relative importance of these selective and stochastic processes for phenotypic variation within and among populations is unclear. Theoretical and empirical studies from humans as well as natural animal and plant populations have made progress in examining the role of these evolutionary forces within species. Tentative generalizations… 
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