Which Came First? Toxic Facilities, Minority Move‐In, and Environmental Justice

@inproceedings{Pastor2001WhichCF,
  title={Which Came First? Toxic Facilities, Minority Move‐In, and Environmental Justice},
  author={Manuel Pastor and Jim Sadd and John R. Hipp},
  year={2001}
}
Previous research suggests that minority residential areas have a disproportionate likelihood of hosting various environmental hazards. Some critics have responded that the contemporary correlation of race and hazards may reflect post-siting minority movein, perhaps because of a risk effect on housing costs, rather than discrimination in siting. This article examines the disproportionate siting and minority move-in hypotheses in Los Angeles County by reconciling tract geography and data over… CONTINUE READING
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