Where did the Chili Get its Spice? Biogeography of Capsaicinoid Production in Ancestral Wild Chili Species

@article{Tewksbury2005WhereDT,
  title={Where did the Chili Get its Spice? Biogeography of Capsaicinoid Production in Ancestral Wild Chili Species},
  author={Joshua J Tewksbury and Carlos E Manchego and David C Haak and Douglas J. Levey},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={32},
  pages={547-564}
}
The biogeography of pungency in three species of wild chili in the chaco and surrounding highland habitats of southeastern Bolivia is described. We report that Capsicum chacoense, C. baccatum, and C. eximium are polymorphic for production of capsaicin and its analogs, such that completely pungent and completely nonpungent individuals co-occur in some populations. In C. chacoense, the density of plants and the proportion of pungent plants increased with elevation. Above 900 m, all individuals in… Expand

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