Where Is the Best Site on Earth? Domes A, B, C, and F, and Ridges A and B

@article{Saunders2009WhereIT,
  title={Where Is the Best Site on Earth? Domes A, B, C, and F, and Ridges A and B},
  author={Will Saunders and Jonathan S. Lawrence and John W. V. Storey and Michael C. B. Ashley and Seiji Kato and Patrick Minnis and David M. Winker and Guiping Liu and Craig Alan Kulesa},
  journal={Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific},
  year={2009},
  volume={121},
  pages={976 - 992}
}
The Antarctic plateau contains the best sites on earth for many forms of astronomy, but none of the existing bases was selected with astronomy as the primary motivation. In this article, we try to systematically compare the merits of potential observatory sites. We include South Pole, Domes A, C, and F, and also Ridge B (running northeast from Dome A), and what we call “Ridge A” (running southwest from Dome A). Our analysis combines satellite data, published results, and atmospheric models, to… 

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