Where Have You Gone, Sherman Minton? The Decline of the Short-Term Supreme Court Justice

@article{Crowe2007WhereHY,
  title={Where Have You Gone, Sherman Minton? The Decline of the Short-Term Supreme Court Justice},
  author={J. Crowe and Christopher F. Karpowitz},
  journal={Perspectives on Politics},
  year={2007},
  volume={5},
  pages={425 - 445}
}
Against the backdrop of a decade-long wait for a Supreme Court vacancy, legal academics from across the political spectrum have recently proposed or supported significant constitutional or statutory reforms designed to limit the terms of Supreme Court justices and increase the pace of turnover at the Court. Fearing a Court that is increasingly out of touch with the national mood and staffed by justices of advanced age, advocates of term and age limits contend that the trend in Supreme Court… Expand
Counteractive Lobbying in the U.S. Supreme Court
Theories of counteractive lobbying assert that interest groups lobby for the purpose of neutralizing the advocacy efforts of their opponents. We examine the applicability of counteractive lobbying toExpand

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