Where Are We Now? Bergmann’s Rule Sensu Lato in Insects

@article{Shelomi2012WhereAW,
  title={Where Are We Now? Bergmann’s Rule Sensu Lato in Insects},
  author={Matan Shelomi},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2012},
  volume={180},
  pages={511 - 519}
}
  • M. Shelomi
  • Published 22 August 2012
  • Environmental Science
  • The American Naturalist
Bergmann’s rule states that individuals of a species/clade at higher altitudes or latitudes will be larger than those at lower ones. A systemic review of the known literature on inter- and intraspecific variation in insect size along latitudinal or altitudinal clines was done to see how often such clines appeared and whether they reflected classwide, species-specific, or experimentally biased tendencies. Nearly even numbers of studies showed Bergmann clines and converse-Bergmann clines, where… 
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