When two heads are better than one: Interactive versus independent benefits of collaborative cognition.

@article{Brennan2015WhenTH,
  title={When two heads are better than one: Interactive versus independent benefits of collaborative cognition.},
  author={Allison Brennan and James T. Enns},
  journal={Psychonomic bulletin & review},
  year={2015},
  volume={22 4},
  pages={1076-82}
}
Previous research has shown that two heads working together can outperform one working alone, but whether such benefits result from social interaction or from the statistical facilitation of independent responses is not clear. Here we apply Miller's (Cognitive Psychology, 14, 247-279, 1982; Ulrich, Miller & Schröter, Behavior Research Methods, 39(2), 291-302, 2007) race model inequality (RMI) to distinguish between these two possibilities. Pairs of participants completed a visual enumeration… CONTINUE READING
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