When to leave: the timing of natal dispersal in a large, monogamous rodent, the Eurasian beaver

@article{Mayer2017WhenTL,
  title={When to leave: the timing of natal dispersal in a large, monogamous rodent, the Eurasian beaver},
  author={Martin Mayer and Andreas Zedrosser and Frank Rosell},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2017},
  volume={123},
  pages={375-382}
}

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