When time slows down: The influence of threat on time perception in anxiety

@article{BarHaim2010WhenTS,
  title={When time slows down: The influence of threat on time perception in anxiety},
  author={Yair Bar-Haim and Aya Kerem and Dominique Lamy and Dan Zakay},
  journal={Cognition and Emotion},
  year={2010},
  volume={24},
  pages={255 - 263}
}
Here, we explored the effect of exposure to threat versus neutral stimuli on time perception in anxious (n=29) and non-anxious (n=29) individuals using predictions from the attentional gate model (AGM) of time perception. Results indicate that relative to non-anxious individuals, anxious individuals subjectively experience time as moving more slowly when exposed to short (2-second) presentations of threat stimuli, and that group differences disappear with longer exposure durations (4 and 8… 
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