When memory shifts toward more typical category exemplars: accentuation effects in the recollection of ethnically ambiguous faces.

@article{Corneille2004WhenMS,
  title={When memory shifts toward more typical category exemplars: accentuation effects in the recollection of ethnically ambiguous faces.},
  author={Olivier Corneille and Johanne Huart and Emilie Becquart and Serge Br{\'e}dart},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2004},
  volume={86 2},
  pages={
          236-50
        }
}
In 4 studies, the authors examined the impact of categorization on the recollection of ethnically ambiguous faces. Participants were presented with faces lying at various locations on mixed-race continua (i.e., Caucasian-North African and Caucasian-Asian faces were used as source images in a morphing program). In all studies, the prevalence of exclusive ethnic features in a face distorted participants' recollections of the face toward faces more typical of the category. Specifically, the… Expand
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