When log‐dwellers meet loggers: impacts of forest fragmentation on two endemic log‐dwelling beetles in southeastern Australia

@article{Schmuki2006WhenLM,
  title={When log‐dwellers meet loggers: impacts of forest fragmentation on two endemic log‐dwelling beetles in southeastern Australia},
  author={Christina Schmuki and Christoph Vorburger and David Runciman and Scott MacEachern and Paul Sunnucks},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2006},
  volume={15}
}
Anthropogenic activities continue to cause massive fragmentation and reduction of forest area worldwide. With fragmentation and reduction of habitat recognized as the greatest threats to biodiversity, the implementation of improved, informed and conservation‐based forestry practices is essential, and requires a greater understanding of the responses of different organisms to forest fragmentation. While genetic techniques can add invaluable insights to fragmentation studies they have rarely been… 
Impacts of massive landscape change on a carnivorous marsupial in south-eastern Australia: inferences from landscape genetics analysis
Summary 1 In much of the world, fauna has been adversely affected by human actions, including conversion of forests to farmland, logging and regulation of river flows. Landscape genetics data
The effects of different forestry practices on two native rodent species, the swamp rat (Rattus lutreolus) and the long-tailed mouse (Pseudomys higginsi)
TLDR
The abundance results indicated that swamp rats were highly sensitive to harvesting while long-tailed mice were resilient and able to persist in harvested areas, and there was also a significant positive relationship between swamp rat abundance and lower strata vegetation cover in harvesting areas.
Phylogeography of Saproxylic and Forest Floor Invertebrates from Tallaganda, South-eastern Australia
TLDR
An overview of a body of research on flightless low-mobility forest invertebrates from Tallaganda on the Great Dividing Range of south-eastern Australia is presented, and cases of phylogeographic congruence, pseudo-congruence, and incongruence are highlighted.
Unexpected persistence on habitat islands: genetic signatures reveal dispersal of a eucalypt‐dependent marsupial through a hostile pine matrix
TLDR
Evidence of at least some immigration into patches may explain why P. volans has persisted contrary to expectation in heavily fragmented habitat.
Limited ecological connectivity of an arboreal marsupial across a forest/plantation landscape despite apparent resilience to fragmentation
TLDR
The continuous forest was identified as an important source of immigrants only for proximate patches (within 2.5 km), thus emphasizing for the common ringtail possum and more specialized arboreal mammals the need to conserve large, proximate forest remnants.
Spatio‐temporal variation in mortality rates of Mecodema spp. (Coleoptera: Carabidae) across a forest‐grassland edge in New Zealand
TLDR
Analysis of a 10‐year climate record shows that soil moisture deficits occur annually, suggesting that seasonal variation in soil moisture may contribute to the variation in the distribution and abundance of the two species.
Habitat fragmentation in forests affects relatedness and spatial genetic structure of a native rodent, Rattus lutreolus
TLDR
The results suggest that removal of mature forest creates barriers for swamp rat dispersal, and roads may have long-term impacts, while harvesting of native forests is likely to create only short-term dispersal barriers at the local scale, depending on the rate of regeneration.
Species- and sex-specific connectivity effects of habitat fragmentation in a suite of woodland birds.
TLDR
For all but the most sedentary species in this system, the movement of the more dispersive sex maintains overall genetic connectivity across fragmented landscapes in the study area, despite some small-scale effects on the more philopatric sex for some species.
Physiology Complements Population Structure of Two Endemic Log-Dwelling Beetles
TLDR
This study studied whether the different habitat requirements of two species of tenebrionid beetles in temperate eucalypt forest could explain their patterns of dispersal and gene flow by applying flow-through respirometry to analysis of their physiological responses to different, ecologically relevant temperatures.
Functional connectivity and landscape genetics of Box–Ironbark birds
TLDR
The need for management to increase both connectivity, for the least mobile species, and critical resource availability for other species to conserve these declining species is highlighted.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 87 REFERENCES
The impact of habitat fragmentation on dispersal of Cunningham’s skink (Egernia cunninghami): evidence from allelic and genotypic analyses of microsatellites
TLDR
Analysis of dispersal patterns of a rock crevice‐dwelling lizard, Cunningham’s skink, in a naturally vegetated reserve and an adjacent deforested site indicates that habitat fragmentation has the potential to alter at least the microevolution of E. cunninghami populations.
Genetic effects of forest fragmentation on a rainforest restricted lizard (Scincidae: Gnypetoscincus queenslandiae)
TLDR
Overall, however, the genetic structure of the populations appears to be dominated by historical (natural) rather than current (anthropogenic) fragmentation and this complicates attempts to assess the effects of the latter.
Recent habitat fragmentation caused by major roads leads to reduction of gene flow and loss of genetic variability in ground beetles
  • I. Keller, C. Largiadèr
  • Biology, Medicine
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2003
TLDR
Findings strongly support the hypothesis that large roads are absolute barriers to gene flow in C. violaceus, which may lead to a loss of genetic variability in fragmented populations.
The Tumut experiment – integrating demographic and genetic studies to unravel fragmentation effects: a case study of the native bush rat
TLDR
Detailed field-based demographic studies showed that the bush rat was virtually absent from exotic softwood stands, and strong positive relationships also were observed between the area of remnants and the probability of patch occupancy by the species; small patches were significantly more likely to be unoccupied.
Limited effect of anthropogenic habitat fragmentation on molecular diversity in a rain forest skink, Gnypetoscincus queenslandiae
TLDR
The observed changes in genetic diversity within and among populations are small, but in the direction predicted by the theory of genetic erosion in recently fragmented populations, especially when effective population size and dispersal rates are low.
The effects of habitat fragmentation due to forestry plantation establishment on the demography and genetic variation of a marsupial carnivore, Antechinus agilis
TLDR
The results show that although the remnant habitat patches comprise approximately 2% of the study area, they can support non-isolated populations, however, the distribution of agile antechinus populations in the fragmented system is dependent on habitat quality and patch connectivity.
Constrasting Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on the Scorpion Cercophonius Squama and an Amphipod
TLDR
Monitoring of populations of the scorpion Cercophonius squama and the terrestrial am- phipod, Family Tallitridae, found that scorpions seem resistant to the changed ecological conditions brought about by habitat fragmentation, at least in the short term, whereas amphipods are more suscep- tible.
FOOD SHORTAGE IN SMALL FRAGMENTS: EVIDENCE FROM AN AREA-SENSITIVE PASSERINE
TLDR
This study tested the food abundance hypothesis in two small and two large forest fragments located in a matrix of agricultural land in northeastern New South Wales, Australia, and determined whether food supply was associated with foraging efficiency and reproductive performance in an area-sensitive, ground-foraging insectivore, the Eastern Yellow Robin, breeding at these same sites.
Effects of habitat fragmentation on carabid beetles: experimental evidence
TLDR
The possibility that other aspects of habitat modification in remnants may explain some of the results and the possibility that this is where future research be directed is suggested.
The influence of forest management history on the integrity of the saproxylic beetle fauna in an Australian lowland tropical rainforest
Forest management in temperate and boreal regions is often based on a strong foundation of applied ecological research. Increasingly, this has allowed the needs of saproxylic (dead wood associated)
...
1
2
3
4
5
...