When left means right: an explanation of the left cradling bias in terms of right hemisphere specializations.

@article{Bourne2004WhenLM,
  title={When left means right: an explanation of the left cradling bias in terms of right hemisphere specializations.},
  author={Victoria J. Bourne and Brenda K. Todd},
  journal={Developmental science},
  year={2004},
  volume={7 1},
  pages={
          19-24
        }
}
Previous research has indicated that 70-85% of women and girls show a bias to hold infants, or dolls, to the left side of their body. This bias is not matched in males (e.g. deChateau, Holmberg & Winberg, 1978; Todd, 1995). This study tests an explanation of cradling preferences in terms of hemispheric specialization for the perception of facial emotional expression. Thirty-two right-handed participants were given a behavioural test of lateralization and a cradling task. Females, but not males… CONTINUE READING

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