When is straightforwardness a liability in negotiations? The role of integrative potential and structural power.

Abstract

Negotiations present individuals with a paradox. On the one hand, individuals are expected via social norms and formal regulations to be honest and straightforward in their negotiations. On the other hand, individuals who mislead their negotiation counterpart are often rewarded with more favorable settlements. The authors investigate this paradox by examining the relationship between negotiators' dispositional straightforwardness and concessions made during a negotiation. Drawing from the dual concern model (D. G. Pruitt & J. Z. Rubin, 1986), the authors show how dispositional straightforwardness leads individuals to develop a greater concern for their counterpart's interests, which in turn leads to greater concession making during the negotiation. The authors then show how this individual-level relationship is moderated by features of the negotiation task, namely integrative potential and power.

DOI: 10.1037/a0014965

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Cite this paper

@article{DeRue2009WhenIS, title={When is straightforwardness a liability in negotiations? The role of integrative potential and structural power.}, author={D. Scott DeRue and Donald E. Conlon and Henry Moon and Harold Wayne Willaby}, journal={The Journal of applied psychology}, year={2009}, volume={94 4}, pages={1032-47} }