When is iron overload deleterious, and when and how should iron chelation therapy be administered in myelodysplastic syndromes?

@article{Steensma2013WhenII,
  title={When is iron overload deleterious, and when and how should iron chelation therapy be administered in myelodysplastic syndromes?},
  author={David P. Steensma and Norbert Gattermann},
  journal={Best practice \& research. Clinical haematology},
  year={2013},
  volume={26 4},
  pages={
          431-44
        }
}

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