When facing our fallibility constitutes "safe practice": Further evidence for the Medical Error Disclosure Competence (MEDC) guidelines.

@article{Hannawa2019WhenFO,
  title={When facing our fallibility constitutes "safe practice": Further evidence for the Medical Error Disclosure Competence (MEDC) guidelines.},
  author={Annegret F. Hannawa},
  journal={Patient education and counseling},
  year={2019}
}
  • A. Hannawa
  • Published 30 April 2019
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Patient education and counseling
Disclosing Adverse Events in Clinical Practice: The Delicate Act of Being Open
TLDR
It is demonstrated that specific disclosure communication strategies on the level of interpersonal skills, organization, and supportive factors may facilitate healthcare professionals to provide optimal disclosure of adverse events.
Communication about medical errors.
  • L. Kaldjian
  • Medicine
    Patient education and counseling
  • 2020

References

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“It Matters What I Think, Not What You Say”: Scientific Evidence for a Medical Error Disclosure Competence (MEDC) Model
TLDR
In a simulated disclosure setting, physicians’ communicative skills—particularly effective nonverbal communication during a disclosure—trigger outcomes that affect the patient, the physician, and the provider-patient relationship.
What constitutes "competent error disclosure"? Insights from a national focus group study in Switzerland.
TLDR
This study provides concrete evidence-based starting points for the development of a disclosure training that is grounded in a communication science model, aiming to support clinicians, institutions and patients with this challenging task.
"Explicitly implicit": examining the importance of physician nonverbal involvement during error disclosures.
  • A. Hannawa
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Swiss medical weekly
  • 2012
TLDR
The findings of this study imply that nonverbal communication has a significant impact on error disclosure outcomes and thus should be considered as an important component of future research and disclosure training efforts.
Disclosing medical errors to patients: effects of nonverbal involvement.
  • A. Hannawa
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Patient education and counseling
  • 2014
Communicating with patients about medical errors: a review of the literature.
TLDR
Empirical research on disclosure of medical errors to patients and families has been limited, and studies have focused primarily on the decision stage of disclosure.
Patients' and physicians' attitudes regarding the disclosure of medical errors.
TLDR
Physicians may not be providing the information or emotional support that patients seek following harmful medical errors, and should strive to meet patients' desires for an apology and for information on the nature, cause, and prevention of errors.
Apology in medical practice: an emerging clinical skill.
TLDR
Although an apology is a significant part of the dialogue between physician and patient following disclosure of a medical error, there are few systematic studies or comprehensive discussions of the apology process in medical practice, despite the burgeoning literature on apology in the behavioral sciences.
Parental Preferences for Error Disclosure, Reporting, and Legal Action After Medical Error in the Care of Their Children
Objective. No data exist on parental preferences for disclosure, reporting, and seeking legal action after errors in the care of their children are disclosed. This study examined parental preferences
Disclosing Medical Errors to Patients: Attitudes and Practices of Physicians and Trainees
TLDR
There appears to be a gap between physicians’ attitudes and practices regarding error disclosure, and willingness to disclose errors was associated with higher training level and a variety of patient-centered attitudes, and it was not lessened by previous exposure to malpractice litigation.
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