When can efforts to control nuisance and invasive species backfire?

@article{Zipkin2009WhenCE,
  title={When can efforts to control nuisance and invasive species backfire?},
  author={Elise F. Zipkin and Clifford E. Kraft and Evan G. Cooch and Patrick J. Sullivan},
  journal={Ecological applications : a publication of the Ecological Society of America},
  year={2009},
  volume={19 6},
  pages={
          1585-95
        }
}
  • E. Zipkin, C. Kraft, P. Sullivan
  • Published 1 September 2009
  • Environmental Science
  • Ecological applications : a publication of the Ecological Society of America
Population control through harvest has the potential to reduce the abundance of nuisance and invasive species. However, demographic structure and density-dependent processes can confound removal efforts and lead to undesirable consequences, such as overcompensation (an increase in abundance in response to harvest) and instability (population cycling or chaos). Recent empirical studies have demonstrated the potential for increased mortality (such as that caused by harvest) to lead to… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Assessing population increase as a possible outcome to management of invasive species

TLDR
It is suggested that overcompensation is not likely to occur in this population of the European green crab, Carcinus maenas, which was being removed in Bodega Harbor, California in response to removal.

Stage-specific overcompensation, the hydra effect, and the failure to eradicate an invasive predator

TLDR
This is the first controlled experimental field demonstration showing that harvest-driven overcompensation produced a 30-fold, single-year increase in the abundance of the invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenas), one of the world’s most invasive predators.

Density-dependent colonization and natural disturbance limit the effectiveness of invasive lionfish culling efforts

TLDR
In a 21-month-long field experiment on natural reefs, it was found that culling effectiveness changed after the passage of a hurricane part-way through the experiment, and the two culling frequencies seemed to offer a poor trade-off between conservation gains that can be achieved with frequent culling and the economy of time and money realized by infrequent culling.

Targeting season and age for optimizing control of invasive rabbits

TLDR
This simulation study supports the use of pest rabbit control methods that account for demographic dynamics explicitly, and target those individuals with high reproductive potential, and shows that local and temporal population extirpation, or recovery, depends largely on the trade-off between control intensity and frequency for species with recurrent population oscillations.

Compensatory recruitment, dynamic habitat, and selective gear present challenges to large‐scale invasive species control

Control of long-established invasive species to aid threatened native species presents major logistic and economic challenges. Invasive common carp (Cyprinus carpio) recently accounted for over 90%

Overcompensatory response of a smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) population to harvest: release from competition?

TLDR
A density-dependent, stage-struc- tured model was developed to examine conditions under which population control through harvest could result in the increase of a tar- geted species and the importance of overcompensation was demonstrated.

Comparison of Harvest Scenarios for the Cost-Effective Suppression of Lake Trout in Swan Lake, Montana

TLDR
A population model was developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of mechanical removal strategies for suppressing long-term abundance of nonnative Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush in Swan Lake, Montana and examined the efficacy of targeting life stages using temporally pulsed fishing effort for reducing abundance and program cost.

Optimising fishery characteristics through control of an invasive species: strategies for redfin perch control in Lake Purrumbete, Australia.

Invasive fish species can present difficult management problems, particularly when the species has recreational value. One such case is redfin perch in Lake Purrumbete, Australia, which have
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 60 REFERENCES

Overcompensatory response of a smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) population to harvest: release from competition?

TLDR
A density-dependent, stage-struc- tured model was developed to examine conditions under which population control through harvest could result in the increase of a tar- geted species and the importance of overcompensation was demonstrated.

Complex population dynamics and control of the invasive biennial Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard).

TLDR
It is suggested that management of A. petiolata should focus on managing adults rather than rosettes, and on creating efficient control in targeted areas of the population, rather than spreading less efficient efforts widely.

Control of structured populations by harvest

Seasonal Compensation of Predation and Harvesting

TLDR
The objective is to clarify the relationship between compensation and density dependence in population models for vertebrates when seasonality is present and to illustrate how density dependence is the mechanism behind compensatory mortality and natality.

Stage‐structured harvesting and its effects: an empirical investigation using soil mites

TLDR
The population response to harvesting depends on the stage/age structure and the way it changes with harvesting and environmental conditions, which explains the way in which the population parameters respond.

DENSITY-DEPENDENT COMPENSATION IN BLOWFLY POPULATIONS GIVE INDIRECTLY POSITIVE EFFECTS OF A TOXICANT

TLDR
The indirectly positive effects of the toxicant cadmium were caused by density-dependent compensatory reactions, which resulted from lower repro- duction and lower survival of young larvae.

Fish predation and trapping for rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) control: a whole-lake experiment

TLDR
This work investigated the potential to control a rusty crayfish population in an isolated lake in northern Wisconsin by trapping adult cray Fish and restricting fishing, thereby increasing fish populations and predation on small cray fish, and used an age-structured population model to determine which removal method had the largest effect on craysfish population growth rates.

Fecundity as a Basis for Risk Assessment of Nonindigenous Freshwater Molluscs

  • R. KellerJ. DrakeD. Lodge
  • Environmental Science
    Conservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
  • 2007
TLDR
This work applied recently developed risk assessment approaches to nonindigenous freshwater molluscs at two geographic scales: the Laurentian Great Lakes basin and the 48 contiguous states of the United States and showed that nuisance status was positively associated with fecundity.

Ecological balance in the native population dynamics may cause the paradox of pest control with harvesting.

Catastrophes, disturbances and density-dependence: population dynamics of the spiny pocket mouse (Heteromys desmarestianus) in a neotropical lowland forest

  • R. Klinger
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of Tropical Ecology
  • 2007
TLDR
The results indicate that population dynamics of many tropical small-mammal populations will be driven by direct and indirect effects from density-independent events that amplify density-dependent influences on demographic rates.
...