When being right is not enough: four-year-olds distinguish knowledgeable informants from merely accurate informants.

@article{Einav2011WhenBR,
  title={When being right is not enough: four-year-olds distinguish knowledgeable informants from merely accurate informants.},
  author={Shiri Einav and Elizabeth J. Robinson},
  journal={Psychological science},
  year={2011},
  volume={22 10},
  pages={
          1250-3
        }
}
Recent evidence demonstrates that children are selective in their social learning, preferring to learn from a previously accurate speaker than from a previously inaccurate one. We examined whether children assessing speakers' reliability take into account how speakers achieved their prior accuracy. In Study 1, when faced with two accurate informants, 4- and 5-year-olds (but not 3-year-olds) were more likely to seek novel information from an informant who had previously given the answers unaided… CONTINUE READING

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