When Your Gain Is My Pain and Your Pain Is My Gain: Neural Correlates of Envy and Schadenfreude

@article{Takahashi2009WhenYG,
  title={When Your Gain Is My Pain and Your Pain Is My Gain: Neural Correlates of Envy and Schadenfreude},
  author={Hidehiko Takahashi and Motoichiro Kato and Masato Matsuura and Dean Mobbs and Tetsuya Suhara and Yoshiro Okubo},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={323},
  pages={937 - 939}
}
We often evaluate the self and others from social comparisons. We feel envy when the target person has superior and self-relevant characteristics. Schadenfreude occurs when envied persons fall from grace. To elucidate the neurocognitive mechanisms of envy and schadenfreude, we conducted two functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. In study one, the participants read information concerning target persons characterized by levels of possession and self-relevance of comparison domains. When… Expand
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