When Two (or More) Heads are Better Than One: The Promise and Pitfalls of Shared Leadership

@article{Otoole2002WhenT,
  title={When Two (or More) Heads are Better Than One: The Promise and Pitfalls of Shared Leadership},
  author={J. O'toole and Jay R. Galbraith and E. Lawler},
  journal={California Management Review},
  year={2002},
  volume={44},
  pages={65 - 83}
}
In both the business press and in academic journals, corporate leadership typically is portrayed as a solo activity, the responsibility of one person at the top of an organizational hierarchy. However, evidence shows that shared leadership is not only common in the corporate world, it is often more effective than the storied "one-man shows." Ongoing research at the University of Southern California's Center for Effective Organizations pinpoints several factors needed to make joint leadership a… Expand

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Together as one : shared leadership between managers
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