When Photographs Create False Memories

@article{Garry2005WhenPC,
  title={When Photographs Create False Memories},
  author={M. Garry and Matthew P. Gerrie},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={14},
  pages={321 - 325}
}
Photographs help people illustrate the stories of their lives and the significant stories of their society. However, photographs can do more than illustrate events; in this article, we show that photographs can distort memory for them. We describe the course of our “false-memory implantation” research, and review recent work showing that photographs can sometimes increase—while other times decrease—false memories. First, we discuss research showing that a doctored photo, showing subjects taking… Expand

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