When More than Property Is Lost: The Dignity Losses and Restoration of the Tulsa Riot of 1921

@article{Brophy2016WhenMT,
  title={When More than Property Is Lost: The Dignity Losses and Restoration of the Tulsa Riot of 1921},
  author={Alfred L. Brophy},
  journal={Law \&\#x0026; Social Inquiry},
  year={2016},
  volume={41},
  pages={824 - 832}
}
  • A. Brophy
  • Published 1 September 2016
  • Sociology
  • Law & Social Inquiry
Bernadette Atuahene's We Want What's Ours focuses on deprivations that go beyond property losses. Her focus is on the dignity harms to South Africans over centuries, such as denial of citizenship, that accompanied the theft of their land. I focus here on one grotesque episode of violence, the Tulsa race riot of 1921, to gauge dignity takings in a US context. Thousands were, in the parlance of the times, run out of town in a “negro drive.” They lost property, but also their community, and they… 
Racially Restrictive Covenants—Were They Dignity Takings?
Racially restrictive covenants—subdivision rules or neighborhood agreements that “run with the land” to bar sales of rentals by minority members—were common and legally enforceable in the United
Dignity Takings and Dignity Restoration: Creating a New Theoretical Framework for Understanding Involuntary Property Loss and the Remedies Required
In We Want What's Ours: Learning from South Africa's Land Restitution Program, I introduced the concept of “dignity takings,” which I defined as property confiscation that involves the dehumanization

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