When I use a word…: Oe no!

@article{Aronson1997WhenIU,
  title={When I use a word…: Oe no!},
  author={Jeffrey K. Aronson},
  journal={BMJ},
  year={1997},
  volume={315}
}
As chairman of examiners in last year's preclinical examinations I was responsible for drafting the examiners' report. I circulated the first draft to my coexaminers. One of them asked me to change “fetus” to “foetus.” Fetus derives from the Latin word feto , I breed, but the spelling “foetus” has been around since at least the beginning of the seventh century. St Isidore, Archbishop of Seville, in a section entitled “De homine et partibus eius” in his Originum sive etymologiarum libri ( Books… Expand
4 Citations
When I use a word ... Ordinary words with extraordinary meanings.
  • J. Aronson
  • Medicine
  • QJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physicians
  • 2008
TLDR
Words, adapting Peter Medawar, are like church bells, and it is their fault as bellringers if they do not make a cheerful and harmonious sound when the authors ring out their message. Expand
What's wrong with using the F word? A systematic integrative review of how the fetus is talked about in situations of fetal demise or high risk of fetal loss.
TLDR
This review examines the language used when referring to the 'fetus' in instances of fetal loss and high risk of fetal demise to better understand the meaning different groups might ascribe to the fetus and how their word choice may reflect their strategies for managing in these situations. Expand
When I use a word ... Misunderspellings.
  • J. Aronson
  • Medicine
  • QJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physicians
  • 2011
TLDR
There is something so attractive about Bush's portmanteau word that the term ‘misunderspelled’ is proposed to refer to words that have been consistently misspelled specifically because of a misunderstanding. Expand
Evidence based transatlantic orthography
How reassuring that The BMJ allows authors to perpetuate myths, albeit whimsically, encouraging us all to do likewise, without fearing pedantic intervention from editors or rabid responses.1 Expand