When Events Change Their Nature: The Neurocognitive Mechanisms Underlying Aspectual Coercion

@article{Paczynski2014WhenEC,
  title={When Events Change Their Nature: The Neurocognitive Mechanisms Underlying Aspectual Coercion},
  author={Martin Paczynski and R. Jackendoff and G. Kuperberg},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2014},
  volume={26},
  pages={1905-1917}
}
The verb “pounce” describes a single, near-instantaneous event. Yet, we easily understand that, “For several minutes the cat pounced…” describes a situation in which multiple pounces occurred, although this interpretation is not overtly specified by the sentence's syntactic structure or by any of its individual words—a phenomenon known as “aspectual coercion.” Previous psycholinguistic studies have reported processing costs in association with aspectual coercion, but the neurocognitive… Expand
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