When Do We Confront? Perceptions of Costs and Benefits Predict Confronting Discrimination on Behalf of the Self and Others

@article{Good2012WhenDW,
  title={When Do We Confront? Perceptions of Costs and Benefits Predict Confronting Discrimination on Behalf of the Self and Others},
  author={Jessica J. Good and C. Moss-Racusin and D. Sanchez},
  journal={Psychology of Women Quarterly},
  year={2012},
  volume={36},
  pages={210 - 226}
}
Across two studies, we tested whether perceived social costs and benefits of confrontation would similarly predict confronting discrimination both when it was experienced and when it was observed as directed at others. Female undergraduate participants were asked to recall past experiences and observations of sexism, as well as their confronting behaviors. Path modeling in Study 1 (N = 148) demonstrated that women were more likely to report confronting if they believed that the confrontation… Expand

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