When Disaster Strikes: Rethinking Caging Materials

@article{Koehler2003WhenDS,
  title={When Disaster Strikes: Rethinking Caging Materials},
  author={K. E. Koehler and R. Voigt and Sally Thomas and Bruce J. Lamb and Cheryl Urban and T. Hassold and P. Hunt},
  journal={Lab Animal},
  year={2003},
  volume={32},
  pages={24-27}
}
The value of research using lab animals hinges on the ability to carry out experiments in a tightly controlled environment. Diet, caging materials (e.g., cages and water bottles), and other environmental variables have the potential to create serious disruptions in animal studies. The authors describe the inadvertent damage of polycarbonate caging materials during the course of routine cagewashing, providing an instructive example and illustrating the importance of defined and controlled… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Rodent Facilities and Caging Systems
Housing and Environment
Environmental and Equipment Monitoring
Plumbing: Special Considerations
Bisphenol A exposure disrupts egg development in the mouse.
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 34 REFERENCES
Bisphenol A is released from used polycarbonate animal cages into water at room temperature.
Hermaphroditic, demasculinized frogs after exposure to the herbicide atrazine at low ecologically relevant doses
  • T. Hayes, Atif Collins, +4 authors A. Vonk
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2002
Bisphenol A Exposure Causes Meiotic Aneuploidy in the Female Mouse
Reproductive malformation of the male offspring following maternal exposure to estrogenic chemicals.
  • C. Gupta
  • Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
  • 2000
Normal sexual development of two strains of rat exposed in utero to low doses of bisphenol A.
...
1
2
3
4
...