When Can I Drive?: Brake Response Times After Contemporary Total Knee Arthroplasty

@article{Dalury2011WhenCI,
  title={When Can I Drive?: Brake Response Times After Contemporary Total Knee Arthroplasty},
  author={David F. Dalury and Kimberly K. Tucker and Todd C. Kelley},
  journal={Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research{\textregistered}},
  year={2011},
  volume={469},
  pages={82-86}
}
BackgroundAfter right total knee arthroplasty (TKA), patients are usually eager to return to driving. Previous studies suggest 6 weeks postsurgery is a safe time. However, recent advances in surgical technique, pain management, and rehabilitation have theoretically improved recovery after TKA.Questions/purposesWe therefore determined if (1) the timeframe for return to driving, as determined by attainment of preoperative braking levels, would be shorter after contemporary right TKA than that… 

Brake response time returns to the pre-surgical level 6 weeks after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

It is concluded that brake response time returns to pre-operative levels 6 weeks after UKA surgery and it is proposed that driving be abstained from for that period.

When Can I Drive? Predictors of Returning to Driving After Total Joint Arthroplasty.

Important predictors identified for return to driving were sex, joint laterality, limited ability to walk or ability to break, and feeling safe.

When is it Safe to Resume Driving Following a Right-Sided Hip or Knee Replacement?

It is recommended that patients refrain from driving for 2-4 weeks following a hip replacement and 6-8 weeksFollowing a knee replacement due to a wide variation in the recovery of safe driving ability.

Early resumption of driving within 3 weeks following patient-specific instrumented total knee arthroplasty: an evaluation of 160 cases

A majority of patients resume driving within 3 weeks after undergoing a PSI TKA, regardless of operative side or transmission of vehicle.

Right TKR Patients Treated with Enhanced Pain and Rehabilitation Protocols Can Drive at 2 Weeks.

It is concluded that one of the benefits of enhanced pain and rehab protocols is that patients undergoing right TKR can return to driving in most instances at the 2-week mark rather than the traditional 6- weeks mark.

Brake Response Time before and after Total Knee Arthroplasty - Tracking Possible Effects of the Surgery Technique on Motor Performance: Report of Two Cases

A randomized controlled trial on the effects of two surgery techniques (minimally invasive vs. standard approach) on BRT was designed and the motor performance of two female patients was compared.
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