What we can do and what we cannot do with fMRI

@article{Logothetis2008WhatWC,
  title={What we can do and what we cannot do with fMRI},
  author={N. Logothetis},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2008},
  volume={453},
  pages={869-878}
}
  • N. Logothetis
  • Published 2008
  • Physics, Medicine
  • Nature
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the mainstay of neuroimaging in cognitive neuroscience. Advances in scanner technology, image acquisition protocols, experimental design, and analysis methods promise to push forward fMRI from mere cartography to the true study of brain organization. However, fundamental questions concerning the interpretation of fMRI data abound, as the conclusions drawn often ignore the actual limitations of the methodology. Here I give an overview of… CONTINUE READING
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