What voices can do with words: pragmatics of verbal hallucinations.

@article{Leudar1997WhatVC,
  title={What voices can do with words: pragmatics of verbal hallucinations.},
  author={Ivan Leudar and Philip Thomas and D McNally and Andrew V. Glinski},
  journal={Psychological medicine},
  year={1997},
  volume={27 4},
  pages={
          885-98
        }
}
BACKGROUND In this paper we consider verbal hallucinations as inner speech with pragmatics. The specific pragmatic properties of verbal hallucinations investigated included the number of voices, the characteristics that individuate the voices, the sequential characteristics of the dialogues between voice hearers and their voices, the dialogical positioning of voices hearers, voices and other individuals, and how the voices influence voice hearers' activities. METHODS These properties were… Expand
Voices to reckon with: perceptions of voice identity in clinical and non-clinical voice hearers
TLDR
The findings overall point to significant difficulties recognizing familiar speakers and discriminating between unfamiliar speakers in people with schizophrenia, both with and without AVH, as well as multidimensional scaling of voice dissimilarity judgments. Expand
Hearing Voices: The Histories, Causes and Meanings of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations
The meanings and causes of hearing voices that others cannot hear (auditory verbal hallucinations, in psychiatric parlance) have been debated for thousands of years. Voice-hearing has been bothExpand
Living with voices: a thematic analysis of individuals’ experiences of voice-hearing in India
ABSTRACT People hearing voices are often considered as those who need psychiatric and psychological treatment. There has been a lack of emphasis on understanding the meaning behind the voices and theExpand
A pilot study of gender of voice and gender of voice hearer in psychotic voice hearers.
TLDR
The general experience of a dominant voice was hostile but participants noted that the degree of hostility changed with the level of stress in other aspects of their lives, which may reveal further subtle distinctions between voice and voice hearer in regard to gender. Expand
Voice-hearing and emotion: an empirical study
This survivor‒researcher-led project investigates emotional aspects of the experience of hearing voices in the general English adult population. Although voice-hearing is strongly associated withExpand
Thematic associations between personal goals and clinical and non-clinical voices (auditory verbal hallucinations)
The content of voices is often self-referent, and related to concerns or salient aspects of voice-hearers’ lives. Based on a cybernetic theory of cognition and behaviour known as Perceptual ControlExpand
The linguistic signature of hallucinated voice talk in schizophrenia
TLDR
There is a distinctive linguistic profile to voice speech, which constrains theories of AVHs and their neurocognitive basis, according to patients with schizophrenia and highly frequent voices obtained online and annotated for pre-selected linguistic variables. Expand
Unsolicited reports of voice hearing in the general population: a study using a novel method
ABSTRACT Understanding the phenomenological range of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), or voice hearing (VH) experiences, is important for developing etiological models. To circumvent potentialExpand
Voice-Hearing and Personification: Characterizing Social Qualities of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Early Psychosis
TLDR
The findings highlight significant personification of AVH even at first clinical presentation, and personified voices appear to be distinguished less by their intrinsic properties, commanding qualities, or connection with trauma than by their affordances for conversation and companionship. Expand
Auditory verbal hallucinations and continuum models of psychosis: A systematic review of the healthy voice-hearer literature
TLDR
Overall the results of the present systematic review support a continuum view rather than a diagnostic model, but cannot distinguish between ‘quasi’ and ‘fully’ dimensional models. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 44 REFERENCES
The omnipotence of voices. A cognitive approach to auditory hallucinations.
TLDR
It is shown that highly disparate relationships with voices-fear, reassurance, engagement and resistance-reflect vital differences in beliefs about the voices, and how these core beliefs about voices may become a new target for treatment. Expand
The auditory hallucination: a phenomenological survey.
TLDR
A pattern emerged of increasing complexity of the auditory-verbal hallucination over time by a process of accretion, with the addition of more voices and extended dialogues, and more intimacy between subject and voice, which seemed to relate to the lessening of distress and improved coping. Expand
Abnormal monitoring of inner speech: a physiological basis for auditory hallucinations
TLDR
It is suggested that a predisposition to verbal hallucinations is associated with a failure to activate areas concerned with the monitoring of inner speech. Expand
Verbal hallucinations and language production processes in schizophrenia
How is it that many schizophrenics identify certain instances of verbal imagery as hallucinatory? Most investigators have assumed that alterations in sensory features of imagery explain this. ThisExpand
Verbal hallucinations in normals, I: People who hear ‘voices’
Two studies are reported that describe the phenomena of verbal hallucinations in the general population and test two explanations of those reports. Subjects were 198 male and 387 female collegeExpand
Self-repair in dialogues of schizophrenics: Effects of hallucinations and negative symptoms
TLDR
It is found that schizophrenics with verbal hallucinations had a specific problem with self-repairing wrong instructions, and the framework of Hoffman's (1986b) plan disruption-based model of verbal hallucinations; the Frith (1987) and Frith and Done (1988) internal monitoring model of positive and negative symptoms; and finally Frithand Frith's (1990) model of negative and positive schizophrenia is used. Expand
Cognitive behavior therapy for persistent auditory hallucinations: From theory to therapy
In this paper we briefly review psychological research into the causes and treatment of auditory hallucinations. A model of hallucinations is described in which it is hypothesized that hallucinatoryExpand
Reinforcement of vocal correlates of auditory hallucinations by auditory feedback: a case study.
  • P. Green, M. Preston
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science
  • 1981
TLDR
A schizophrenic patient is described whose whispers were increased to an intelligible level by the use of auditory feedback, which has implications for the self-control of hallucinations, and for neurological theories of verbal hallucinations. Expand
The Hallucinations of Widowhood
227 widows and 66 widowers were interviewed to determine the extent to which they had hallucinatory experiences of their dead spouse. The people interviewed formed 80·7% of all widowed peopleExpand
Distributions of hallucinations in the population.
  • A. Tien
  • Medicine
  • Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology
  • 1991
TLDR
There were substantial gender differences, and the effect of aging to increase the incidence of hallucinations was the most consistent and prominent. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...