What types of learning are enhanced by a cued recall test?

@article{Carpenter2006WhatTO,
  title={What types of learning are enhanced by a cued recall test?},
  author={Shana K. Carpenter and Harold Pashler and Edward Vul},
  journal={Psychonomic Bulletin \& Review},
  year={2006},
  volume={13},
  pages={826-830}
}
In two experiments, we investigated what types of learning benefit from a cued recall test. After initial exposure to a word pair (A+B), subjects experienced either an intervening cued recall test (A→?) with feedback, or a restudy presentation (A→B). The final test could be cued recall in the same (A→?) or opposite (?→B) direction, or free recall of just the cues (Recall As) or just the targets (Recall Bs). All final tests revealed a benefit for testing as opposed to restudying. Tests produced… 
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