What the Filibuster Tells Us About the Senate

@article{Schickler2011WhatTF,
  title={What the Filibuster Tells Us About the Senate},
  author={Eric Schickler and Gregory J. Wawro},
  journal={The Forum},
  year={2011},
  volume={9}
}
We argue that even as the Senate filibuster poses serious governance challenges in today’s Congress, it persists because most senators prefer to maintain the minority’s right to obstruct. We consider what this rank-and-file support for the filibuster tells us about the nature of individual senators’ preferences and about the Senate as an institution. We believe that continued support for the filibuster underscores the importance of personal power and publicity goals, the ability of rules to… 
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