Corpus ID: 5661976

What quantum algorithms outperform classical computation and how do they do it ? BY

@inproceedings{BAcon2010WhatQA,
  title={What quantum algorithms outperform classical computation and how do they do it ? BY},
  author={BY DAVe BAcon and W. V. Dam},
  year={2010}
}
notion of the algorithm—the quantum algorithm—whose computational power appears to be fundamentally more efficient at carrying out certain tasks than algorithms written for today’s, nonquantum, computers. Could this possibly be true: that there is a more fundamental notion of algorithmic efficiency for computers built from quantum components? And, if this is true, what exactly is the power of these quantum algorithms? The shot that rang round the computational world announcing the arrival of… Expand

References

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TLDR
For any quantum computation with t gates, it is shown how to build a polynomial size quantum circuit that tolerates O(1/log/sup c/t) amounts of inaccuracy and decoherence per gate, for some constant c; the previous bound was O( 1/t). Expand
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In early 1994, it was demonstrated that a quantum mechanical computer could efficiently solve a well-known problem for which there was no known efficient algorithm using classical computers, i.e. testing whether or not a given integer, N, is prime, in a time which is a finite power of o (logN) . Expand
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TLDR
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Recent research has demonstrated that quantum computers can solve certain types of problems substantially faster than the known classical algorithms. These problems include factoring integers andExpand
Quantum computation and decision trees
Many interesting computational problems can be reformulated in terms of decision trees. A natural classical algorithm is to then run a random walk on the tree, starting at the root, to see if theExpand
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Abstract Central to the EPR paradox is a ‘thought experiment’ in which two spins are initially coupled to a state with S  = 0 and are then separated to a large distance, at which they can beExpand
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TLDR
A black box graph traversal problem that can be solved exponentially faster on a quantum computer than on a classical computer is constructed and it is proved that no classical algorithm can solve the problem in subexponential time. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
An O(N/sup k/(k+1)/) query quantum algorithm is given for the generalization of element distinctness in which the authors have to find k equal items among N items. Expand
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TLDR
Calculations of the water and lithium hydride molecular ground-state energies have been carried out on a quantum computer simulator using a recursive phase-estimation algorithm and mapping of the molecular wave function to the quantum bits are described. Expand
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