What neuroimaging tells us about sensory substitution

@article{Poirier2007WhatNT,
  title={What neuroimaging tells us about sensory substitution},
  author={Colline Poirier and Anne G. De Volder and Christian Scheiber},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2007},
  volume={31},
  pages={1064-1070}
}
A major question in the field of sensory substitution concerns the nature of the perception generated by sensory substitution prostheses. Is the perception determined by the nature of the substitutive modality or is it determined by the nature of the information transmitted by the device? Is it a totally new, amodal, perception? This paper reviews the recent neuroimaging studies which have investigated the neural bases of sensory substitution. The detailed analysis of available results led us… Expand
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TLDR
This review argues that sensory substitution does indeed show properties of synaesthesia and proposes two testable predictions: firstly that, in an expert user of a sensory substitution device, the substituting modality should not be lost, and secondly that stimulation within the substitution modality, but by means other than a sensory replacement device, should still produce sensation in the normally substituted modality. Expand
Sensory Substitution and Multimodal Mental Imagery
TLDR
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Mixing up the Senses: Sensory Substitution Is Not a Form of Artificially Induced Synaesthesia.
TLDR
It is found that sensory substitution does not fulfil the essential criteria that characterise synaesthesia and thus, the 'artificial synesthesia' view of sensory substitution should be rejected. Expand
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TLDR
Establishing how experience and different etiologies of vision loss affect the performance of these devices may help to improve existing rehabilitation strategies, formulate effective selection criteria and develop prognostic measures is discussed. Expand
Individual Differences in Sensory Substitution.
TLDR
Those studies that investigated the individual differences at the behavioural, neural, and phenomenological levels when using a sensory substitution device are reviewed to highlight how taking into account individual differences has consequences for the optimization and learning of sensory substitution devices. Expand
Reading the World through the Skin and Ears: A New Perspective on Sensory Substitution
TLDR
It is shown why the analogy with reading provides a better explanation of the actual findings, that is, both of the positive results achieved and of the limitations noticed across the field of research on sensory substitution. Expand
Looking into Task-Specific Activation Using a Prosthesis Substituting Vision with Audition
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Sensory rehabilitation in the plastic brain.
TLDR
It is stressed that the understanding of the neuroplastic changes that occur in sensory-deprived individuals may help guide the design and the implementation of such rehabilitative methods, and two promising rehabilitative strategies based on opposing theoretical principles will be considered. Expand
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