What makes a planet habitable?

@article{Lammer2009WhatMA,
  title={What makes a planet habitable?},
  author={Helmut Lammer and Jan Hendrik Bredeh{\"o}ft and Athena Coustenis and Maxim L. Khodachenko and Lisa Kaltenegger and Olivier Grasset and Daniel Prieur and François Raulin and Pascale Ehrenfreund and Masatoshi Yamauchi and Jan-Eric Wahlund and Jean-Mathias Grie{\ss}meier and Guenter Stangl and Charles S. Cockell and Yu. N. Kulikov and John Lee Grenfell and Heike Rauer},
  journal={The Astronomy and Astrophysics Review},
  year={2009},
  volume={17},
  pages={181-249}
}
This work reviews factors which are important for the evolution of habitable Earth-like planets such as the effects of the host star dependent radiation and particle fluxes on the evolution of atmospheres and initial water inventories. We discuss the geodynamical and geophysical environments which are necessary for planets where plate tectonics remain active over geological time scales and for planets which evolve to one-plate planets. The discoveries of methane–ethane surface lakes on Saturn’s… 
Pathways to Earth-Like Atmospheres
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  • F. Forget
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    International Journal of Astrobiology
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