What justifies the United States ban on federal funding for nonreproductive cloning?

@article{Cunningham2013WhatJT,
  title={What justifies the United States ban on federal funding for nonreproductive cloning?},
  author={Thomas V Cunningham},
  journal={Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy},
  year={2013},
  volume={16},
  pages={825-841}
}
  • Thomas V Cunningham
  • Published 2013
  • Political Science, Medicine
  • Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy
  • This paper explores how current United States policies for funding nonreproductive cloning are justified and argues against that justification. I show that a common conceptual framework underlies the national prohibition on the use of public funds for cloning research, which I call the simple argument. This argument rests on two premises: that research harming human embryos is unethical and that embryos produced via fertilization are identical to those produced via cloning. In response to the… CONTINUE READING
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