What justifies the United States ban on federal funding for nonreproductive cloning?

@article{Cunningham2013WhatJT,
  title={What justifies the United States ban on federal funding for nonreproductive cloning?},
  author={Thomas Vandiver Cunningham},
  journal={Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy},
  year={2013},
  volume={16},
  pages={825-841}
}
  • T. V. Cunningham
  • Published 30 January 2013
  • Philosophy
  • Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy
This paper explores how current United States policies for funding nonreproductive cloning are justified and argues against that justification. I show that a common conceptual framework underlies the national prohibition on the use of public funds for cloning research, which I call the simple argument. This argument rests on two premises: that research harming human embryos is unethical and that embryos produced via fertilization are identical to those produced via cloning. In response to the… 

Philosophy and Science Policy in the American Cloning Debate

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