What is the role of dopamine in reward: hedonic impact, reward learning, or incentive salience?

@article{Berridge1998WhatIT,
  title={What is the role of dopamine in reward: hedonic impact, reward learning, or incentive salience?},
  author={Kent C. Berridge and Terry E. Robinson},
  journal={Brain Research Reviews},
  year={1998},
  volume={28},
  pages={309-369}
}
What roles do mesolimbic and neostriatal dopamine systems play in reward? Do they mediate the hedonic impact of rewarding stimuli? Do they mediate hedonic reward learning and associative prediction? Our review of the literature, together with results of a new study of residual reward capacity after dopamine depletion, indicates the answer to both questions is 'no'. Rather, dopamine systems may mediate the incentive salience of rewards, modulating their motivational value in a manner separable… Expand
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