What is specific to music processing? Insights from congenital amusia

@article{Peretz2003WhatIS,
  title={What is specific to music processing? Insights from congenital amusia},
  author={I. Peretz and K. Hyde},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2003},
  volume={7},
  pages={362-367}
}
  • I. Peretz, K. Hyde
  • Published 2003
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences
Musical abilities are generally regarded as an evolutionary by-product of more important functions, such as those involved in language. However, there is increasing evidence that humans are born with musical predispositions that develop spontaneously into sophisticated knowledge bases and procedures that are unique to music. Recent findings also suggest that the brain is equipped with music-specific neural networks and that these can be selectively compromised by a congenital anomaly. This… Expand
237 Citations

Paper Mentions

Observational Clinical Trial
Adult recipients of cochlear implants (CI) generally loose interest in listening to music. This may be due to the rather limited spectral resolution of CI. However, child CI… Expand
ConditionsCochlear Implant Recipients
InterventionBehavioral
Amusia and Musical Functioning
Studies into the cognitive and neural basis of congenital amusia
ON-LINE IDENTIFICATION OF CONGENITAL AMUSIA
Brain organization for music processing.
Fine-grained pitch processing of music and speech in congenital amusia.
The Biological Foundations of Music: Insights from Congenital Amusia
Congenital amusias.
Identification of Changes along a Continuum of Speech Intonation is Impaired in Congenital Amusia
Sensitivity to musical structure in the human brain.
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