What implications do the tolerability profiles of antiandrogens and other commonly used prostate cancer treatments have on patient care?

@article{Mason2006WhatID,
  title={What implications do the tolerability profiles of antiandrogens and other commonly used prostate cancer treatments have on patient care?},
  author={Malcolm Mason},
  journal={Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology},
  year={2006},
  volume={132},
  pages={27-35}
}
  • M. Mason
  • Published 2006
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology
PurposeIncreased awareness of prostate cancer has led to earlier initiation of therapy, and the potential for a longer duration of treatment has led to a stronger emphasis on tolerability. Historically, the mainstay of treatment of hormone-sensitive prostate cancer has been castration-based therapy, but antiandrogens are now emerging as an alternative. This article reviews the tolerability profiles of antiandrogens as well as other existing treatments for prostate cancer and examines their… Expand
Attitudes of prostate cancer patients towards the diagnosis and treatment of their disease: findings from a multinational survey
TLDR
As patients place the most emphasis on disease control and outliving their disease, and may experience improved quality of life while on hormonal therapy, physicians should not exclude treatment options on the basis of potential side effects alone. Expand
[Cardiovascular risks of androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer].
TLDR
Cardiovascular side effects cannot be sufficiently explained by low testosterone levels and an increase of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has recently been discussed in association with ADT. Expand
A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 exerts anti-androgenic activity in the prostate cancer xenograft R–3327G and anabolic activity on skeletal muscle mass & function in castrated mice
TLDR
MK-4541 exhibits an optimum profile as an adjuvant therapy to ADT which may provide potent anti-androgenic activity at the prostate yet protective activity on skeletal muscle and behavior in patients. Expand
Sex hormones and related compounds, including hormonal contraceptives
TLDR
This chapter discusses sex hormones and related compounds including hormonal contraceptives, and Diethylstilbestrol has clearly been shown to cause primary vaginal carcinoma in the second generation and tumors continue to occur in women in middle age. Expand
The effect of prostate cancer on endurance exercise capacity in the rat
TLDR
Endurance exercise capacity was reduced in rats with untreated prostate cancer to a greater extent than it was reducing in sham operated rats, and reductions in heart and gastrocnemius muscle mass likely played an important role. Expand
Chapter 40 - Sex hormones and related compounds, including hormonal contraceptives
TLDR
There was no difference in the risk of myocardial infarction or stroke associated with current use of conjugated equine estrogens or esterified estrogens compared with no treatment, and the risks in the children of mothers who had been exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol have been studied. Expand
Kardiovaskuläre Risiken der Androgendeprivationstherapie beim Prostatakarzinom
TLDR
Cardiovascular side effects cannot be sufficiently explained by low testosterone levels and an increase of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has recently been discussed in association with ADT. Expand
Longitudinal study of intestinal symptoms and fecal continence in patients with conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer.
TLDR
Except for rectal bleeding, the intestinal symptoms, including fecal incontinence, returned to baseline levels within 1-2 years after CRT, and the rate of long-term late radiation-related intestinal toxicity was low. Expand

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 72 REFERENCES
Nonsteroidal antiandrogens: a therapeutic option for patients with advanced prostate cancer who wish to retain sexual interest and function
TLDR
In the absence of sexual interest, the treatment of sexual dysfunction becomes less relevant and therefore hormonal treatments for advanced prostate cancer which spare sexual interest are needed. Expand
Tolerability of Antiandrogens in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer
TLDR
Data is presented on the tolerability of the antiandrogens, both steroidal (cyproterone acetate; CPA) and non-steroidal (bicalutamide, flUTamide, nilutamide), across all stages of hormone-responsive prostate cancer. Expand
Hormone therapy in prostate cancer: LHRH antagonists versus LHRH analogues.
TLDR
GnRH agonists are currently available in a range of depot formulations, allowing treatment to be tailored to the patient's needs, but at present, the antagonists are only available as on-month Depot formulations, which may limit their clinical use. Expand
Combined androgen blockade with nonsteroidal antiandrogens for advanced prostate cancer: a systematic review.
TLDR
There is a 5% improvement in the percentage of men surviving at 5 years with combined androgen blockade with nonsteroidal antiandrogen as well as improvements in progression-free survival at 1 year, and appropriate patients with metastatic prostate cancer should be informed of the potential benefits, toxicities, and out-of-pocket expenditures. Expand
The nonsteroidal effects of diethylstilbestrol: the rationale for androgen deprivation therapy without estrogen deprivation in the treatment of prostate cancer.
TLDR
It is readily apparent from the literature that androgen deprivation with DES can achieve effective prostate cancer control with demonstrable benefits compared to conventional LH-RH agonist therapy. Expand
Secondary hormonal therapies in the treatment of prostate cancer.
TLDR
Second-line hormonal therapies have a significant role in the treatment of patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer and further research is needed to understand their optimal use. Expand
Chemotherapy for androgenindependent prostate cancer: Myth or reality
TLDR
The results suggest that prostate cancer is not as resistant to chemotherapy as it was once thought to be, through incorporation of post-therapy changes in PSA to evaluate novel agents. Expand
The effect of Buserelin versus conventional antiandrogenic treatment in patients with T2-4NXM1 prostatic cancer. A prospective, randomized multicentre phase III trial. The "Danish Buserelin Study Group".
TLDR
Tolerability, safety and compliance of Buserelin was although administered intranasally clearly evidenced as palliation of advanced symptomatic cancer and the efficacy and sideeffects were fully comparable to those following orchiectomy. Expand
Maximum androgen blockade in advanced prostate cancer: an overview of the randomised trials
TLDR
In advanced prostate cancer, addition of an antiandrogen to AS improved the 5-year survival by about 2% or 3% (depending on whether the analysis includes or excludes the cyproterone acetate trials), but the range of uncertainty as to the true size of this benefit runs from about 0% to about 5%. Expand
Superior anti-tumor efficacy of bicalutamide 80 mg in combination with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist versus LHRH agonist monotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced prostate cancer: interim results of a randomized study in Japanese patients.
TLDR
First-line treatment with bicalutamide 80 mg in combination with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist is superior to LHRH agonist monotherapy in terms of the antitumor response at 12 weeks, and also time to treatment failure and progression, and does not compromise treatment safety. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...