What if the Women’s Health Initiative had used transdermal estradiol and oral progesterone instead?

@article{Simon2014WhatIT,
  title={What if the Women’s Health Initiative had used transdermal estradiol and oral progesterone instead?},
  author={James A. Simon},
  journal={Menopause},
  year={2014},
  volume={21},
  pages={769–783}
}
AbstractThe author considers hypothetical comparisons between oral conjugated equine estrogens and transdermal estradiol and between oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and oral micronized progesterone for their effects on four primary outcomes of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI): cardiovascular disease risk, cerebrovascular disease risk, venous thromboembolism risk, and breast cancer risk. Although the discussion in this article focuses on transdermal estradiol delivered through patches, gels… Expand
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