What has Functional Neuroimaging told us about the Mind (so far)? (Position Paper Presented to the European Cognitive Neuropsychology Workshop, Bressanone, 2005)

@article{Coltheart2006WhatHF,
  title={What has Functional Neuroimaging told us about the Mind (so far)? (Position Paper Presented to the European Cognitive Neuropsychology Workshop, Bressanone, 2005)
},
  author={Max Coltheart},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2006},
  volume={42},
  pages={323-331}
}
way in which scientists currently study cognition is by cognitive neuroimaging – by recording neural activity in a person's brain while the recorded person is carrying out some cognitive activity. There are numerous different reasons for doing this kind of work. I will consider only one of these reasons, namely, to try to learn more about cognition itself. All other motivations for doing cognitive neuroimaging (e.g., to seek to localise specific cognitive functions in specific brain regions… Expand

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