What does the Ashworth scale really measure and are instrumented measures more valid and precise?

@article{Damiano2002WhatDT,
  title={What does the Ashworth scale really measure and are instrumented measures more valid and precise?},
  author={Diane L. Damiano and Jeffrey M Quinlivan and Bryan F Owen and Patricia Payne and Karen C. Nelson and Mark Abel},
  journal={Developmental medicine and child neurology},
  year={2002},
  volume={44 2},
  pages={
          112-8
        }
}
This study aimed to explore the limitations of the Ashworth scale for measuring spasticity. An isokinetic dynamometer to quantify resistance to passive stretch and surface EMG was used to verify if a stretch response occurred and, if so, at what joint angle. The authors sought to determine which components of passive resistance (magnitude, rate of change, onset angle of stretch, or velocity dependence) were most related to Ashworth scores and which were related to motor function in cerebral… CONTINUE READING

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