What does it mean to be locally adapted and who cares anyway?

@article{Provenza2008WhatDI,
  title={What does it mean to be locally adapted and who cares anyway?},
  author={Frederick D. Provenza},
  journal={Journal of animal science},
  year={2008},
  volume={86 14 Suppl},
  pages={
          E271-84
        }
}
  • F. Provenza
  • Published 1 April 2008
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of animal science
The availability of fossil fuels will likely decline dramatically during the first half of the twenty-first century, and the massive deficits probably will not be alleviated by alternative sources of energy. This seeming catastrophe will create opportunities for communities to benefit from foods produced locally in ways that nurture relationships among soil, water, plants, herbivores, and people to sustain their collective well being. Agriculture will be much more at the heart of communities… 
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  • F. Provenza
  • Biology, Medicine
    Journal of animal science
  • 1996
TLDR
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