What do you do when things go right? The intrapersonal and interpersonal benefits of sharing positive events.

@article{Gable2004WhatDY,
  title={What do you do when things go right? The intrapersonal and interpersonal benefits of sharing positive events.},
  author={S. Gable and H. Reis and E. Impett and Evan R. Asher},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2004},
  volume={87 2},
  pages={
          228-45
        }
}
  • S. Gable, H. Reis, +1 author Evan R. Asher
  • Published 2004
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Journal of personality and social psychology
  • Four studies examined the intrapersonal and interpersonal consequences of seeking out others when good things happen (i.e., capitalization). Two studies showed that communicating personal positive events with others was associated with increased daily positive affect and well-being, above and beyond the impact of the positive event itself and other daily events. Moreover, when others were perceived to respond actively and constructively (and not passively or destructively) to capitalization… CONTINUE READING

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