What did domestication do to dogs? A new account of dogs' sensitivity to human actions

@article{Udell2010WhatDD,
  title={What did domestication do to dogs? A new account of dogs' sensitivity to human actions},
  author={M. Udell and N. Dorey and C. Wynne},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2010},
  volume={85}
}
Over the last two decades increasing evidence for an acute sensitivity to human gestures and attentional states in domestic dogs has led to a burgeoning of research into the social cognition of this highly familiar yet previously under‐studied animal. Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) have been shown to be more successful than their closest relative (and wild progenitor) the wolf, and than man's closest relative, the chimpanzee, on tests of sensitivity to human social cues, such as following points… Expand
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