What can variation in stature reveal about environmental differences between prehistoric Jomon foragers? Understanding the impact of systemic stress on developmental stability

@article{Temple2008WhatCV,
  title={What can variation in stature reveal about environmental differences between prehistoric Jomon foragers? Understanding the impact of systemic stress on developmental stability},
  author={Daniel H. Temple},
  journal={American Journal of Human Biology},
  year={2008},
  volume={20}
}
  • D. Temple
  • Published 1 July 2008
  • Environmental Science
  • American Journal of Human Biology
This study reconstructs patterns of stress and phenotypic variation in prehistoric Japan. Greater evidence for stress is indicated by elevated enamel hypoplasia frequency among Jomon foragers from western compared to eastern Japan. Geographic variation in stress between Jomon people is related to plant‐based diets and resource scarcity in western Japan. The hypothesis that Jomon people from western Japan had shorter stature than those from the east is, therefore, tested. Relationships between… 
Patterns of systemic stress during the agricultural transition in prehistoric Japan.
  • D. Temple
  • Medicine
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2010
TLDR
Systemic stress prevalence in western Japan likely declined following wet-rice agriculture because this crop provided a predictable, renewable resource base, and was similar between eastern Jomon and Yayoi people because both groups practiced intensive subsistence strategies.
Exploring the multidimensionality of stature variation in the past through comparisons of archaeological and living populations.
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Stature in a biocultural context is examined and parallels between bioarchaeological and living populations are drawn to explore the multidimensionality of stature variation in the past and a degree of regional variance in growth outcomes consistent with that observed for highly selected traits is observed.
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Enamel hypoplasia in modern and archaeological caprine populations : the development and application of a new methodological approach
  • B. Upex
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 2009
TLDR
Results indicate that enamel hypoplasia frequency and severity can be linked to variation in the climate /environment as well as nutrition levels in caprine populations.
Estimating the stature of ancient high-altitude Andean populations from skeletal remains of the Chachapoya of Peru.
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The most accurate estimates were based on the tibia rather than the femur and that the calcaneus can be used reliably in stature estimation when no other element is present or measurable.
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