What are the outcomes of self - management that matter to stakeholders ? Study protocol for the Self - Management VOICED project

Abstract

The rapid increase in people living with a long-term health condition (LTHC) has resulted in self-management (SM) becoming an important contemporary issue. SM represents an ideological shift towards increased partnership where patients and their families are given the support needed to be confident and capable at managing their health (Wilkinson and Whitehead, 2009). The direction of United Kingdom health policy endorses both increased support for SM (DoH, 2005, DoH, 2008, DoH, 2011) and the commissioning of services to support self-management (Imison et al., 2011, Richards, 2012). There is less clarity around how SM is viewed, the indicators of successful SM required to target services, and which SM outcomes are prioritised and valued by different stakeholder groups, such as patients, their families, health professionals and commissioners (Chodosh et al., 2005, Coster and Norman, 2009, The Health Foundation, 2011). The Self-management VOICED project (Valued Outcome of Sara Demain, PhD Post-doctoral NIHR fellow, Faculty of Health Sciences

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Demain2014WhatAT, title={What are the outcomes of self - management that matter to stakeholders ? Study protocol for the Self - Management VOICED project}, author={Sara H. Demain and Emma J. Boger and Sue M Latter and Matthew C. Hankins and Anne M. Kennedy and Claire L. Foster and Fiona Jones and Ian Kellar}, year={2014} }